Services / Tefillah


Services at Mount Freedom are lively and informal. Our services are traditional, using the Artscroll Siddur. Our seating arrangement reflects the diversity of our congregation and the values of our membership. While adhering to the ritual requirement of separate seating for men and women, our understated mechitzah runs down the middle of the sanctuary. Men and Women stand side by side before God. Owing to our openness, we provide sacred space for family seating for families who prefer to sit together.

Weekly

Morning services (minyan) take place at 6:45 a.m., Monday through Friday. Sunday and National holiday services begin at 8:00 a.m. Holiday services begin at 9 a.m. Minor fast days are marked by afternoon services. Evening minyan is convened upon request, especially when someone is observing a yarzheit memorial service on the anniversary of the passing of a loved one. Shiva services are hosted at the mourner’s home. Our community considers it a great honor to help make the minyan, morning and night, for the mourner.

Kiddush

Shabbat

Our congregation welcomes Shabbat with a Friday Kabbalat Shabbat service. Services will meet at sunset from November through March. During daylight savings time, services begin at 6:45 p.m. Shabbat morning services begin at 9:00 a.m.

Kiddushes are provided after Saturday Morning services. They provide time to snack and socialize, feeding the body and mind. One Saturday each month, we feature a “Shared Kiddush” where numerous families co-sponsor and often prepare the Kiddush to celebrate Birthdays, Anniversaries, or any other special event with the congregation.

Holidays

Holidays

Services for holidays usually begin at 9 a.m. and specific schedules are distributed.

During Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, seating is expanded into the synagogue social hall to accommodate the larger number of attendees. The main sanctuary is reserved for separate seating and the social hall is for “family seating.” During High Holidays, the bimah is moved from the front of the sanctuary to the center of both rooms to provide all of our attendees access to the services and the Torah reading.

Women in Shul

Women in Shul

The issue of women’s participation in synagogue life is a vitally important conversation in the Jewish world. MFJC takes this issue very seriously. Our daughters will grow to become the mothers and grandmothers of the Jewish future. Throughout the lifecycle and the calendar cycle, women play an important spiritual role at MFJC. A girl’s Baby-Naming and B’not Mitzvah are celebrated as moments of great holiness, a true Simcha. Throughout the year, on Shabbat and holidays, MFJC supports Women’s halachikaly acceptable ritual involvement in services. Every week, women carry the Torah and women are encouraged to deliver sermons. Annually, MFJC supports a Women’s Simchat Torah Torah reading, community Kabbalat Shabbat services led by women for everyone, and leading the reading of the book of Esther on Purim. And while we are proud of the initiatives that women have taken in our shul, more can still be done…

Youth

Youth and Teens

Each Saturday, MFJC offers pre-schoolers through 3rd graders a Tot Shabbat program in the classrooms, with special monthly “Kandy Kiddush” Shabbats. Older youth, through B´nai Mitzvah age, enjoy bi-monthly Jr. Congregation programs led by community teens and the United Jewish Communities of Greater MetroWest Shlichim, visiting educators from Israel. Services for youth are also offered on holidays.

Teens are always encouraged and welcome to participate in services in the Main Sanctuary. Throughout the year, the Rabbi schedules “Teen Takeover Shabbat” so our young adults can “takeover,” leading services, reading Torah, and providing insightful sermons to the congregation. Participation does not end at B´nai Mitvzah-it is only the beginning! A synagogue highlight is the closing of services, where all children are welcomed to stand at the front of the sanctuary, leading the songs and helping us close our services.



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